Kantaro the Sweet Tooth Salaryman

Kantaro the Sweet Tooth Salaryman

If you are in need of something completely different tonight. And god knows I can’t blame you if you are, I’ve got something weird for you. Kantaro the Sweet Tooth Salaryman. It’s goofy as hell which is what I personally need tonight.

Originally a manga but the series is generally regarded as being superior.

This one is really more for fans of the original version of Iron Chef.   It’s Bizarro Food-Porn. Kantaro has a kind of all-encompassing, Mister Spock like obsession with desserts, which in and of itself totally makes sense if you have ever known a high-end Chocolatier.  

Seriously, those guys are like monks, no reason to think their fanboys would be any different.

The food monk in question
Naughty monk!
Naughty!


And no, nothing is going on under the table, that is just his reaction to pancakes with maple syrup. Which the Japanese completely get wrong of course.

Kantaro got a job as a salesman so he could “play hooky” and sneak off to have dessert dates by himself.  This “playing hooky” is a big no-no in Japan.  Although speaking from experience every salesman on Earth does it.  But if he gets caught he will lose his dream job ya-da, ya-da. 

There is a Sally Love-Interest who is hopelessly in love with him and haplessly pursuing him. Kantaro is secretly running a blog called the “Sweets Knight” where he reviews the desserts he secretly indulges in. The romance works because of the antagonistic approach she takes to pursuing his secret identity. And antagonism is the secret to any decent romance, if you don’t believe me then you’ve never heard of Pride and Prejudice.

My second favorite character is Kantaro’s tough as nails, “only Closers get coffee,” sales-manger boss. The actor totally nailed his part, he got that one right in every possible way.  He’s just like every good sales manager I’ve ever known. Bombastic and driving one minute but a caring teacher the next. If you ever get into sales, this is the guy you want as your boss.

My favorite character appeared in only one episode.  When you first meet Kantaro in the opener you can’t help but wonder, “he’s so weird, what’s his damage?”  Then you let that question slide beneath the surface as you realize that this show is a little too goofy to worry about things like that.

Then towards the end of the season, the curtain rises on Kantaro’s mother (a dentist) calling to tell him that she has a Continuing Education Conference in his neck of the woods. And can he put her up for the night? “Excellent, I’ll be there at seven.” 

His mother’s voice then drops an octave or two and she asks him, “Kantaro-chan, you haven’t been eating sweets have you?” And then holds her high pitched, whirring dentist’s drill up to the phone’s mike. A cavalcade of childhood horrors washes across Kantaro’s face and you suddenly realize the extent of his “damage.”

This show is goofy, lightweight, and oddball enough to lift you out of our current world for an hour or two.

It also makes me miss Japan quite a bit. Which doesn’t happen all that much.

Currently available on Netflix and that seems to be it.

The Dark Herald Recommends with Confidence.

See you Monday.
 

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Comments (2)

  • overgrownhobbit Reply

    Arigato! The hobbit household will check it out.

    Three suggestions for less well-known series:

    Ancient-but-fun: Project-X (manga only) https://www.anime-planet.com/manga/project-x-cup-noodle. Think Iron Chef, but with 7-11. Yes. That 7-11.

    Also old and a good choice for Sergius minors: Sherlock Hound. Exactly what it sounds like. Free on YouTube and various streaming services.

    Silver Spoon – You will only get the full story via scanlation, but it’s worth it. The two seasons in anime are delightful: Japanese school story + 4H.

    Have fun!

    November 12, 2020 at 2:34 am
  • DJ Reply

    I very much found myself delightfully surprised by, and enjoying, Silver Spoon.
    At first, the idea of a townie at an agricultural school in Japan seems ludicrous, but I think that the setting is fresh and insightful into a part of Japanese culture that gets overlooked by flashy urban settings.
    I still find Girls und Panzers to be a delightful guilty pleasure, though.

    December 15, 2020 at 8:26 pm

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